New York’s historic Paris Theatre under threat after more than 70 years in business

Future of citys last single screen cinema, opened by Marlene Dietrich and frequented by David Bowie, hangs in the balance The Paris Theatre has become one of New Yorks cultural landmarks since it was officially opened by the actor Marlene Dietrich as a cinema for showing French films in 1948. Down the road from Central Park and across the street from the Plaza hotel, it attracted queues around the block as the go-to place to watch arthouse and foreign language films and was known for showing the same movie for months on end. In the early 00s it gained cult status with Sex and the City fans after Carrie Bradshaw declared it one of the best features of Manhattan life …

The Projectionist review Abel Ferrara’s wistful, indulgent ode to cinema

In a loving yet overlong documentary, the director looks back on 1970s New York and how movie-watching has changed Of Martin Scorseses classic Taxi Driver, the film critic Ty Burr once wrote, Before Times Square was a Disneyfied tourist heaven, children, it was hell. The New York of the 1970s had the dangerous luster of a well-polished razor blade, with hedonism and crime simultaneously hitting a hysterical peak. Forty-second Street was full of coke, pimps and working girls; the downtown scene was all art freaks and experimentalists creating raw expressions of urban fervor with whatever they could get their hands on. The neon lights of porn theaters would advertise smut with the same caliber of pizzazz as the major cineplexes. …